Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher

Source:  Purchased
Released:  May 3rd 2007
Published by:  Hodder Children's Book
Page Count is 458

Incarceron -- a futuristic prison, sealed from view, where the descendants of the original prisoners live in a dark world torn by rivalry and savagery. It is a terrifying mix of high technology -- a living building which pervades the novel as an ever-watchful, ever-vengeful character, and a typical medieval torture chamber -- chains, great halls, dungeons. A young prisoner, Finn, has haunting visions of an earlier life, and cannot believe he was born here and has always been here. In the outer world, Claudia, daughter of the Warden of Incarceron, is trapped in her own form of prison -- a futuristic world constructed beautifully to look like a past era, an imminent marriage she dreads. She knows nothing of Incarceron, except that it exists. But there comes a moment when Finn, inside Incarceron, and Claudia, outside, simultaneously find a device -- a crystal key, through which they can talk to each other. And so the plan for Finn's escape is born ... Description from goodreads.


This book was brilliantly written and captured my imagination from the very beginning.  The story follows Fin who is a prisoner of Incarceron.  He has no memory of his past and no idea where he came from except for the past three years of living in Incarceron.  Fin is prone to violent fits and blackouts which cause him to see visions of Outside.  The Sapient believe Fin is a Cellborn and that his visions are a means of Escape from the bowels of Incarceron.  This earns him the title of "Starseer" among the Scum, a band of ruthless murders and thieves.  When he comes into procession of a crystal key, which bears the same marking as the one tattooed on his wrist, a black bird with a crown, more questions arise about his past.  Fin's character is careful, thoughtful, and even conniving at times, but his character is often overwhelmed because of constant uncertainty about his visions, what they mean, and who he is.

Claudia's character is a whole different story.  Her character is malicious, strong, and commanding.  These traits are not typical of the usual characters found to be heroines, making the story feel fresh when you read it.  Claudia's skill at lying and manipulation developed from growing up in the house of her father, the Warden of Incarceron, who is even more manipulative and sly then his daughter.  Claudia fears her father and completely mistrusts him.  They are always competing.  Always playing the game.  The game of lying.  She was "bred" only for the Warden's purposes of ruling the thrown through marriage, as her father so loving puts it.  His character is one you love to hate, but there is always a card hidden up the Warden's unwrinkled sleeve.

Constantly I was thrown loop after loop of the complexities of the novel.  Incarceron was deceptive and wistful and alive!  This idea intrigued me and made the book incredibly engaging.  Magic and science played a huge role in this story as well.  Protocol was heavily enforced on all the people living in the Realm, Outside of the world of Incarceron, where everyone lived in an era of manners, politics, and formality.  This book, which was bought on a whim, most definitely deserves a top spot on every readers overflowing bookshelf.







~Kelsa

6 comments:

  1. This is a really awesome review, Kelsa. I really love it when books really capture your imagination. It's what I loved most about My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares too. By the way thanks for dropping by and reading my review for that book.

    Brush Up On Your Reading

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  2. That's also why I added My Name is Memory to my to-read list after I read your review. It just sounds like something I could devour page after page. :)

    Your welcome! You know I love reading your reviews! Thanks for commenting. :)

    ~Kelsa

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  3. Great Review! This one has been around for awhile, but I've never seen such a detailed review. And the female MC sounds delightful. Malicious you say? I think I might have to read this one though I've never been tempted before. Are you going to read Sapphique next? I hope so. Really great review. I'll put this on my list.

    Heather

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  4. Thank you Heather! Once I put a dent in my recently bought books I'm going to get the sequel Sapphique on my to-read list. :)

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  5. "Deceptive, wistful, and alive" Wow! I love the way you've described this book. I already wanted to read it but now I'm even more motivated. Excellent review!

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  6. Thank you so much! It definitely needs to be read by everyone at least once. Its one of those rare books you just thoroughly enjoy without expecting too. :)

    ~Kelsa

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I love comments and enjoy reading them so don't be shy! You know you want to. ;) I do my best to respond to everyone's comments when I can. If your following me and I haven't returned the favor, let me know! Happy blogging!

~Kelsa

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